June 21: The longest day of the Year



Tomorrow is June 21,

. The longest day of the year, which makes it the shortest night of the year. It’s the day that the sun is most powerful here on earth.

In ancient times, on the Greek calendar, it was the start of the New Year and Cronus, the god of agriculture and time was the center of attention at huge festivals.


The ancient Romans used to leave gifts for the goddess Vertalia before the solstice, asking her to bring blessings on the family.


The Chinese look at the summer solstice as the ‘Yin” or female force, and early Europeans of several cultures had parties at night and lit bonfires, as a way of boosting the sun’s energy to produce a great harvest at the end of the season.


Those involved in witchcraft believe magic is strongest at the summer solstice, and used bonfires also, theirs to banish demons and evil spirits.


Even more interesting, look at some ancient architectures. The Sphinx, for instance. The sun sets directly between the Great Pyramids of Khufu and Khafre on Egypt’s Giza plateau on the summer solstice.


Stonehenge, the megalith monument in southern England, is aligned with the direction of the sunrise on the summer solstice. Coincidence?


Whatever the culture, whatever the time period, the Summer Solstice is a special day for thinking about the Sun, what it represents, what energy it holds and how necessary it is for all life. The Summer Solstice is really more than the first day of summer, more than a longer day to enjoy the sun.


Do all the fun things, but also think of it as a time to try something new. Still fun, but new.

Instead of that bonfire, why not have a barbecue, invite your friends, and share some time appreciating each other’s company.


Have a piece of blueberry pie or blueberry ice cream; smear some honey on toast, both signs of summer. Take a walk in the woods and collect some oak leaves. They ‘re a sign of strength, courage, and endurance, the right way to face the last half of the year.


Make some bath tea. Leave a jar of water outside for the day, at least from noon until four. Add some herbs and add it to your bath for a soothing introduction to the summer season. Try Chamomile or cinnamon. Maybe throw in some St. John’s Wort, which used to be called Chase Devil, used in ancient times to ward off evil spirits.


Write yourself a letter and predict how you see yourself this time Summer Solstice, 2022. Write your goals, your plans, your challenges and solutions. Save it to read next year.


Happy Summer Solstice.

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